Samsung Fold looks not so perfect from the outside beca

ause the camera must not be covered during the folding, while the battery is also thicker. Huawei Mate X looks better, but its display is not protected as well as that of Samsung Fold and faces higher risk of breaking should the phone be dropped.

The two share one thing in common, namely a high price — Both are rather expensive. The Samsu

ng Fold is priced at $1,980 while the Huawei Mate X is priced at 2,299 euros ($2,606). The high price will

quite seriously limit the marketing of the two products and make them the luxuries of rich people only.

According to our analysis and market forecasts, in 2019, the number of f

oldable smartphones and tablets sold globally might reach 900,000, which might do

uble in 2020. As a comparison, people globally bought 1.4 billion smartphones in 2018. In a word, unless its cost fall sh

arply, the market for foldable smartphones will be limited for the foreseeable future.

Yet both Huawei and Samsung have invested huge resources in the research, publicity, and mark

eting of foldable smartphones. There are two main causes for that. First, smartphones are already so

developed that there is hardly any new space for innovation. The iPhone 4 miracle of Steven Jobs can hardly be re

peated in the near future, so both companies need to show the world that they are innovating.

Second, foldable displays need special materials that are quite scarce i

n the market, so neither of the two companies can afford to wait for the other to rise. B

oth need to keep the market in a balance so as to ensure its own share of products.

www.whcoding.cn

Group to map way out of vaccine morassational w s to ens

China has set up a national work group for immunization planning that will suggest ways

to ensure vaccines are safe, the head of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention said on Monday.

The work group, led by a vice-minister of health, will analyze all incidents involving vaccine safety over the past few years to find

the root sources of problems, Gao Fu, head of the center, said at a news conference. He didn’t name the minister.

“Vaccines made in China are some of the best in the world,” said Gao, who is also a member of China’s top poli

tical advisory body. “We should have no doubt about the role of vaccines in disease prevention or the quality of vaccines made in China.”

For example, he said, by promoting immunization, some infectious diseases that

once seriously harmed people’s health in China, such as smallpox, have been eliminated.

Hepatitis B once infected more than 10 percent of the population of China, but now only 0.3 p

ercent of children under 5 years old are carriers because of mandatory immunization.

Gao made the comments in light of a series of incidents involving vaccine safety over the past few years.

whcoding.cn

The country will also push for high-quality developmen

of the sector with a focus on improving financial services and forestalling financial risks.

Opening-up of China’s financial factor has sped up, as the country re

moved foreign ownership caps of banks and financial asset management firms last year.

Richard Turnill, global chief investment strategist of BlackRock, an American global investment man

agement corporation, is also positive on China’s stocks market, according to the Barron’s report.

Turnill said stronger inflows into Chinese A-shares, and China’s efforts to boost credit growth and sti

mulate its economy are also helpful to a bullish stock market.

However, selectivity of stocks is needed, Turnill said, adding that BlackRock favors b

rokers and companies related to the domestic consumer that can benefit from the efforts to stimulate growth locally.

Major securities traders in China, such as the Merchants Securities, CITIC Securities, and Fo

under Securities are all optimistic about China’s stocks market this year, according to a report from finance.sina.com.

www.youhuileyuan.cn

Trade talks expected to finalize dealNG SHUIYU,ZHONG NA

China and the United States are expected to come to an agreement soon over trade frictions, analysts said, as the negotiating teams a

re reported to be discussing the wording of an accord and considering applying the brakes to their tariff standoff.

They made the prediction after Chinese and US officials said there had been concrete p

rogress on multiple issues in the latest round of trade talks in Washington.

During the latest talks, held from Thursday to Sunday in Washington, the seventh round since February of last year, th

e two sides focused on the text of an agreement, the Chinese delegation said, according to a Xinhua News Agency report.

The negotiators also had made substantial progress on such specific issues as technology transfers, protection of i

ntellectual property rights, nontariff barriers, the service industry, agriculture and exchange rates, the delegation said.

On the basis of the latest progress, the two sides are expected to continue their work

into the next stage, in accordance with the instructions of the two countries’ top leaders, according to Xinhua.

youhuileyuan.cn

It’s all about Huawei. World’s biggest mobile tech show g

  Over the next four days, about 100,000 people in Barcelona are expected to traipse through the halls of Mobile Worl

d Congress, one of the tech industry’s biggest events. All the biggest players in the world use it to showcase new products.

  One company really stands out this year: China’s Huawei. Walking

out of the Barcelona airport, there’s a Huawei hospitality stand. The company’s bran

ding dots the city. The lanyards conference attendees wear around their necks are decorated with the Huawei name.

  There’s a good reason everyone is focused on Huawei, one of the world’s largest makers of telecom equipment.

  Huawei is a crucial part of China’s efforts to advance superfast 5G wir

eless networks and today is caught in a life or death battle with the US government.

  The United States claims that Huawei poses a potential national security threat. Last month, US prosecutors revealed cri

minal charges against the company, alleging that Huawei stole trade secrets and worked to skirt US sanctions on Iran.

sjhtjn.cn

We can no longer act as bystanders. We are honour bound to

  We find it unconscionable that a Party once trusted on the economy, more than any other, is now recklessly marching the country to the cliff edge of no d

eal,” the group said. “No responsible government should knowingly and deliberately inflict the dire consequences of

such a destructive exit on individuals, communities and businesses and put at risk the prospect of ending austerity.”

  The MPs also rejected what they say May has presented as a “false binary choice” be

tween a “bad deal” and a “no deal,” slamming her strategy of “running down the clock” to Brexit.

  May said in a statement on Wednesday that she was “saddened” by the lawmakers’ decision to quit the party, but

was determined to deliver on Brexit, affirming that it was “the right thing for the country.”

  The Independent Group was formed on Monday when seven MPs, including Chuka Umunna, Chris Leslie and Luciana Berger, resi

gned from Labour. An eighth Labour MP, Joan Ryan, joined their ranks on Tuesday evening. The group said v

ariously that they had become ashamed of the Labour party and its shift to the hard-left, denouncing opposition le

ader Jeremy Corbyn’s handling of a wave of anti-Semitism and “betrayal” on Brexit.

shlftv.com

Because of sanctions, Iran’s health sector is struggling to

  keep up with soaring prices of medications and medical instruments, doctors tell CNN.

  European banks, fearing secondary US penalties, are reluctant to do business with Iranian companies even those not blacklisted b

y the US. Medical companies have had to resort to paying intermediaries exorbitant sums to secure ne

eded supplies, including imported medicines and medical instruments which have more than tripled in value du

ring Iran’s rapidly dropping currency, health professionals explain.Sanctions is the first problem in our country and in ou

r system. We can’t transfer the money and make the preparations for surgery. It’s a big problem for us,” says Dr. Mo

hammad Hassan Bani Asad, managing director of the Gandhi Hotel Hospital. “We have the procedures, but we don’t hav

e the instruments. It is very difficult for patients and maybe leads to death of some patients.”

  Though most of Iran’s medicines are domestically manufactured, much of the primary materials, m

any of them imported, are in short supply. And while the state provides universal healthcare, so

me of the treatment needed for critical cases cannot be covered by state insurance.

www.qianpadae.com

This year I saw the greats of the Obama-era Iran nuclear

  deal breeze between meetings in a way impossible at the height of those negotiations.

  Yet a few years later, their sage experience is the valued currency of many backroom conversations.

  John Kerry’s sidekick, Wendy Sherman, strolled down t

he street past former US Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, also a member of the Iran nuclear dea

l negotiating team. He was loitering on a street corner waiting for a car. If you had a question for them, you could ask it.

  These people are the unseen grease in the cogs of international diplomacy.

  But the showstopper at the conference was the Yin and Yang of US foreign policy — delivered by Vice President Mike Pence and the guy who had the

job before him, Joe Biden.They spoke on the same day, but could not have been more different in tone, style and substance.

www.shlf21.com

Desperate and alone, Saudi sisters risk everything

  It was September 6, 2018. The two Saudi sisters were on a family vacation in Colombo, Sri Lanka. For weeks, they had helped their mother organize the trip, feigning

excitement at the possibility of two weeks away from Riyadh, but knowing that if all went to plan, they’d never go back.

  Failure was not an option. Every step of their escape from Saudi Arabia carried the threat of severe punishment or death.

  ”We knew the first time, if it’s not perfect, it will be the last time,” Reem says.

  CNN has changed the sisters’ names and is not showing their faces, at their request for their safety.

  The sisters say years of strict Islamic teaching and physical abuse at home had convinced them that they had no future in a socie

ty that places women under the enforced guardianship of men, and limits their aspirations.

  ”It’s slavery, because whatever the woman will do it’s the business of the male,” Rawan says.

  That’s why they say they renounced Islam.

  And that’s why aged 18 and 20, they stole back their own passports, hid their abayas under the b

edcovers, snuck out of their holiday home and boarded a flight from Colombo to Melbourne, via Hong Kong.

  The Hong Kong stopover was supposed to take less than two hours.

  Two hours has turned into five months.

www.gzbbam.com

Brexit is blowing up British politicseeks away, and still no

With Brexit day only weeks away, and still no deal in place, now might not seem the best time for British politicians to flip the table over.

But this week, 11 Members of Parliament have done exactly that. On Monday, seven members of the opposition Labour Party announced tha

t they were fed up of their leader Jeremy Corbyn, citing reasons ranging from rampant anti-Semitism to hi

s lack of leadership on Brexit. They will Theresa May tactics of pandering to the harder-line Brexiteers in her own party and

elsewhere. That means it’s now hard to see this new group as anything other than a pro-EU bloc in the UK Parliament, dissa

tisfied with the pro-Brexit positions of both government and opposition.
Why does that matter?
Brexit has made the politics of the UK in

credibly hard to read. Both frontbenches are committed to delivering Brexit. The government agreed a way to achieve this

with the other 27 EU member states. Yet the UK Parliament hates the deal, infamously handing May the heaviest defeat in the history of the

House of Commons.
And it hates the deal for reasons all across the political spectrum (that’s right, the Brexiteers hate the deal just as

much as the Remainers).
Since the 2016, Brexit has redrawn the ideological lines of politics in the UK. Professor Sara Hobolt at the London Sc

hool of Economics explained that there “are more people now who are willing to identify as either Brexiteers or Remainers than as supporters of any par

ty. This new divide is more tribal than old party politics, with both groups tending to be inherently distrustful of one another.”

www.ashtvt.com